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Glenn Kelman

Chief Executive Officer

Glenn is the CEO of Redfin. Prior to joining Redfin, he was a co-founder of Plumtree Software, a Sequoia-backed, publicly traded company that created the enterprise portal software market. Glenn was raised in Seattle and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley. Redfin is a full-service real estate brokerage that uses modern technology to make clients smarter and faster. For more information about working with a Redfin real estate agent to buy or sell a home, visit our Why Redfin page.

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Most Recent

Home Prices Stabilize, And the Whole Market Grinds to a Halt

Every month, Redfin publishes two newsletters on real estate prices. One, usually published on the last Tuesday of every month, is a Redfin Roundup, which synthesizes data collected by economists, government agencies and others to provide a complete portrait of what happened in the market over the past month. The other is Redfin Insider, usually …

Home Prices Stabilize, And the Whole Market Grinds to a Halt Read More »

The First Dip as Tragedy, The Second as Farce (May Roundup)

Every month, Redfin publishes two newsletters on real estate prices. One, usually published on the last Tuesday of every month, is a Redfin Roundup, which synthesizes data collected by economists, government agencies and others to provide a complete portrait of what happened in the market over the past month. The other is Redfin Insider, usually …

The First Dip as Tragedy, The Second as Farce (May Roundup) Read More »

Endurance

It’s fashionable these days to talk about a startup as a roller–coaster, with ups and downs, flips and flame-outs,  twists and turns. There’s some truth to that, and even more drama and glamor. But roller coaster rides last five minutes, not five years. And as any venture capitalist will tell you, the average holding period …

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When Bad Companies Do Good Things

Entrepreneurs often ask me where good ideas come from. My answer usually is from bad companies. The most obvious example of this is Facebook. MySpace prospered despite its founders’ penchant for pornography, spam and spyware. San Franciscans loved Friendster despite the reputed self-destructiveness of its founder, Jonathan Abrams. Was it really so hard to imagine …

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Knowers and Learners

At breakfast earlier this month, my friend Roy Gilbert made an offhand reference to two types of people, knowers and learners. It was a distinction I’d never heard before. But I liked the idea of identifying someone as a learner, just because it’s so hard to make any change to our identity, unless part of …

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